Jan 18 Upcoming API / Hardware Support Changes Hi Friends, We have seen quite a few threads with people upset and confused about the new warnings in the Blizzard app. Warnings that tell you that your system will be unsupported soon. While this is true in some cases, I would like to provide some resources and advice on how to see if you will still be able to play. Here is a list of requirements and resources to help you find out the state of your computer. OS requirements:   Mac - Users computers will need to support the Metal API. A list of Mac computers that can support Metal . Users should also be on a supported macOS. macOS 10.12.X macOS 10.13.x *macOS 10.14.x *(macOS may not be released by the time these changes go live )*   Windows - Users will need to be on the following OS builds, with the 64 bit version installed, and able to support DirectX11. Windows 7 Sp1 Windows 8.1 Windows 10 How to check if you are on a 64 bit OS. 1. Hit Windows key 2. Type “my computer” 3. Right click this PC or the name you gave it 4. Select Properties 5. Look at System type ( You will want 64 bit Operating system listed here ) How to see if your Video card supports DirectX 11. This list is not up to date but if you have a card that is newer than the ones listed, it is likely okay. You can check on the manufacture's website to be sure.   Additional information - We have seen cases where having the in game settings changed to DirectX 9 or WoW set to launch in 32 bit mode will cause these errors. To check if World of Warcraft in 32-bit mode from the Blizzard App 1) Open the Blizzard App 2) Select World of Warcraft 3) Click Options 4) Select Game Settings on the left 5) Uncheck Launch 32-bit client (Instead of 64-bit) 6) Click Done How to disable DirectX 9 if you can. 1) Click Red Question mark in game 2) Go to system 3) Go to Advanced 4) Click Drop down by Graphics API 5) Select DirectX 11 6) Restart the game I hope this information helps my friends and hope you have a wonderful time in World of Warcraft. /NathardrickNathardrick0 Jan 18
A Technical Support Incident (TSI) is a request for code-level support for Apple frameworks, APIs, and tools, and is available to members of the Apple Developer Program, Apple Developer Enterprise Program, and MFi Program. Submit a TSI if you cannot fix a bug, have trouble implementing a specific technology, or have other questions about your code. Your incident will be assigned to a Developer Technical Support engineer who can help troubleshoot your code or investigate possible workarounds to fast-track your development. Support is provided in English via email, typically within three business days.
For an MacBook Air under Apple’s One-Year Limited Warranty, Apple warrants against defects that arise from service performed for 90 days from the date of service or for the remaining period of the warranty, whichever provides longer coverage for you. For an MacBook Air not under Apple’s warranty, Apple warrants against defects that arise from service performed for 90 days from the date of service.
To get all your issues resolved to MacBook Air you can connect to qualified technicians. To knock doors of the call to MacBook Air Technical Support Number and have the reliable services. Support for software issues, internet errors, wireless connection, wireless connectivity error, browser issue and virus threat all are resolved carefully under the skillful tech experts. Work for all and different types of issues including household individual and business class for all troubleshooting is done.
I have been experiencing terrible customer service waiting over 45 plus minutes on hold for assistance on the top of apple taking money from my credit card on file without any purchase being made. While Apple make nice products their customer service assistant is one of the worse I have ever deal with in my life and makes me change my mind about their products. They need serious improvement on their customer service assistances when customers call their number. Terrible experience and very frustrating.
My macbook pro took a little tumble. The screen is not cracked, nor are there vertical lines, blobs, or anything like that. There was a bright blue line just at the bottom of the screen, but it flickered back into place. However, there are veeeeery very light horizontal lines that run through the entire screen now. It's truely hardly noticable unless you're up close to the computer. Honestly, I could live with it, but my screen was so clear before, I'd love to get it back to that quality. I know it's very expensive to replace the screen, but maybe there is something else that can be done or another service I can request before I have to drop that kind of cash? Help?
On June 11, 2012, Apple released an updated model in the same form factor as the prior model. The new model is powered by the new Ivy Bridge dual-core Intel Core i5 and i7 processors, doubles the RAM and SSD speeds, has the new USB 3 ports (with USB 2 capability) in place of the USB 2 ports and the new MagSafe 2 charging port.[38] The camera was upgraded to 720p FaceTime HD.
Hurray for competent people and a well-run small company!  I went to Yelp to find someone to help me clean up my Mac and advise me on how to improve performance.  I was pretty much expecting to be told my iMac was too old to work with...but no.  Shiva comes exactly on time and says "No problem.  Great machine...just needs extra space".  Hurray!  Also advises on improvements to overall Wifi, etc. that MMT does not receive any profit from, and provides the resources on where to get best price.  When there are the usual followup questions after my Mac has a bigger brain, I get immediate responses to my texts and remote support that gets all straightened out in no time.  I would absolutely recommend them and so glad I made the "preventive" appointment before having a total system crash.  Will follow any advice they provide from now on.
I had occasion to use customer support this week after my family gifted me with an IPad. I had difficulty with accessing after setting it up. I didn't catch the gentleman's name but I found his explanations way too fast and his tone arrogant, despite my telling him I was a senior and needed patience. I sat through a lengthy discourse on the difference between a password and a postcode, and I remained locked out. I think his telling me to hang up, sit back, relax and meditate and the password would come to me was his giving up. I give the service a zero. Once I can figure out how to reset the thing it will be going back.
* Trade-in values will vary based on the condition, year, and configuration of your trade-in device. You must be at least 18 years old to be eligible to trade in for credit or for an Apple Store Gift Card. Not all devices are eligible for credit. More details are available from Apple’s Mac trade‑in partner and Apple’s iPhone, iPad, and Apple Watch trade‑in partner for trade-in and recycling of eligible devices. Restrictions and limitations may apply. Payments are based on the received device matching the description you provided when your estimate was made. Apple reserves the right to refuse or limit the quantity of any device for any reason. In the Apple Store: Offer only available on presentation of a valid, government-issued photo ID (local law may require saving this information). Value of your current device may be applied toward purchase of a new Apple device. Offer may not be available in all stores. Some stores may have additional requirements.
If you are the one providing the technical assistance, open Messages, select the name of the person you plan to help — or send a new message to start the conversation — and click the Details button in the upper-right corner of the window. Click the Screen Share icon, which looks like two overlapping rectangles, and select “Ask to share screen.” (If you’re the one needing the help, you can also reach out via a Messages buddy and use the “Invite to Share My Screen” option.)
What does MacTech cover? Each month MacTech provides new content, featuring articles in all areas “tech” related to Apple products (which are all variants of Mac OS X). Just a taste… System administrators, network administrators, IT Pros, and consultants all find MacTech invaluable with articles about solving problems, implementing solutions, or just road testing the latest technologies.
When released in October 2010, the 13" model's screen resolution was higher than the average 1366x768 screens of similar sized laptops. However, by mid-2013, with many premium Ultrabooks having high resolution screens (1080p or greater) as standard or upgrades, the MacBook Air has been increasingly criticized for sticking with a low-resolution screen. Many in the tech community had expected Apple to release a MacBook Air with Retina Display by mid-2013, similar to the MacBook Pro Retina which came out in 2012.[78] The October 2013 refresh of the 13" MacBook Pro Retina, with a slimmer chassis and a lower price point, was mentioned as a potential MacBook Air alternative as the battery life is not much shorter while not being considerably bulkier.[4][79] Apple released an entry-level version of the 13" MacBook Pro on October 27, 2016, which was specifically targeted towards MacBook Air users.[80]
I have had my eyes on a Macbook for the longest time now but that pricing at Best Buy (no different than the Apple Store) was just too much for a 13" & on top of that, there's the tax! I hadn't even thought about buying it online but it hit me one day to look on Amazon and I am SO glad that I did. The pricing for the exact same product here in store (and without tax!) is CHEAPER. I saved SO much money buying this Macbook here on Amazon and I do NOT regret this purchase one bit! I DID think about it a lot and read every last review and looked at all the product pictures (which were all good) and I'm glad to say that I also got a BRAND NEW PACKAGED BY APPLE MACBOOK AIR 13.3 INCH LAPTOP! It was sealed shut in the original Apple packaging brand new! Everything is running smoothly, no problems whatsoever (though I am VERY nervous of leaving a scratch or something on it so I bought a rubberized case & carrying case to keep it safe & looking new!)

After graduating from Bard College a B.A. in Literature, Henry T. Casey worked in publishing and product development at Rizzoli and The Metropolitan Museum of Art, respectively. Henry joined Tom's Guide and LAPTOP having written for The Content Strategist, Tech Radar and Patek Philippe International Magazine. He divides his free time between going to live concerts, listening to too many podcasts, and mastering his cold brew coffee process. Content rules everything around him.
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