We don't know why the support.apple.com site glitched out on multiple occasions, but we were happy to see the issue disappear by our third call. If Apple wants an even better score next year, we'd suggest its agents find footing on Facebook, and make sure its employees know all the ins and outs of its latest features so that callers aren't put on hold while techs investigate.
For my second call, I asked about Siri. I opted for waiting music of my choice at 3:03 p.m. and was on the phone with John in New Mexico at 3:05. John, a friendly and to-the-point representative, pulled up the relevant article and walked me through the steps by 3:07 p.m.. He even emailed me a link to the related support page so I could have those steps handy in the future.
At the launch of the MacBook Air in January 2008, Apple claimed it to be the thinnest laptop in the world. While this was true of laptops on sale at the time, the 2003 Sharp Actius MM10 Muramasas was thinner at some points than the Macbook Air, being 0.54 inches (14 mm) thick at its minimum.[24] It, like the MacBook Air, was a tapered design, with a maximum height of 0.78 inches (19.8 mm) —slightly thicker than the MacBook Air — shown above as 0.76 inches (19.3 mm).[25] The Sony Vaio X505, released in 2004, had a minimum thickness of 0.38 inches (10 mm) and a maximum of 0.8 inches (20.3 mm).[26]

AppleCare for Enterprise starts with an AppleCare Account Manager — your personal liaison with AppleCare. Your AppleCare Account Manager will help review your IT infrastructure, track issues you may be having, and provide monthly activity reports for both support calls and repairs. With continuous support from your AppleCare Account Manager, you and your team will get the most out of AppleCare for Enterprise.
If you are an IT rookie they will tell you what you want to hear. Just try one time to ask a question about the SSL problem from Feb 2015, and they do an about face. In August 2015, my MacBook got hacked with the same SSH Cross Site Scripting using the Man-In-The-Middle. When I called Apple, they were dead silent. Dissembling, misdirecting, obfuscating, worst of all no help. Denied it had anything to do with "Apple" but refused to offer even the simplest of suggestions on how I can prevent it in the future. How do I know if I have the SSL fix in MBP? Well I can't because the SSL problem was in iOS. I went to the developers website and found the same iOS SSL is part of Yosemite. So again, misdirection and lies.
My answer for reversing Safari's new rule for blocking autoplaying came to me in a slightly roundabout way. After searching for "videos in safari aren't autoplaying," I only got results about disabling videos from autoplaying. But clicking on the "Stop autoplay videos" result brought me to a page where I saw a link that said "Customize browsing settings per website," which revealed how to change the autoplay settings for specific websites.
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