On July 20, 2011, Apple released updates to the 11.6" and 13.3" models of the MacBook Air, which also became Apple's entry-level laptops due to lowered prices and the discontinuation of the white MacBook around the same time.[5] The mid-2011 MacBook Airs were powered by the new Sandy Bridge 1.6 or 1.7 GHz dual-core Intel Core i5, or 1.8 GHz dual-core Intel Core i7 processors, that came with an Intel HD Graphics 3000 processor, and with a backlit keyboard, two USB 2.0 ports, FaceTime camera, a standard of 2 GB of RAM (configurable up to 4 GB), Thunderbolt which shares function with Mini DisplayPort and Bluetooth was upgraded to v4.0.[36][37] Maximum SSD flash memory storage options were increased up to 256 GB. Both 11" and 13" models had an analog audio output/headphone minijack (that also supports an iPhone/iPod touch headset with microphone), but only the 13" model had an integrated SDXC-capable SD Card slot. These models use a less expensive "Eagle Ridge" Thunderbolt controller that provides two Thunderbolt channels (2 × 10 Gbit/s bidirectional), compared to the MacBook Pro which uses a "Light Ridge" controller that provides four Thunderbolt channels (4 × 10 Gbit/s bidirectional). A USB ethernet adapter was immediately available upon release and a Thunderbolt-to-Firewire 800 adapter became available in mid-year 2012.
Through July 1, 2013, the MacBook Air took in 56 percent of all Ultrabook sales in the United States, despite being one of the higher-priced competitors. [66] Apple had previously dominated the premium PC market, in 2009 having a 91 percent market share for PCs priced at more than $1,000, according to NPD, and Ultrabooks were an attempt by other PC manufacturers to move in on Apple's turf.[67] While Apple's MacBook lines were not immune to this consumer trend towards mobile devices,[68] they still managed to ship 2.8 million MacBooks in Q2 2012 (the majority of which were the MacBook Air) compared to 500,000 total Ultrabooks,[69][70] despite there being dozens of Ultrabooks from various manufacturers on the market while Apple only offered 11" and 13" models of the Macbook Air.[71] Forrester Research analyst Frank Gillett attributes Apple's increased success in the enterprise market to the 2010 MacBook Air and the iPad.[72]
Thanks for the article. However, if by "power of positivity" you mean condescending attitude, providing cookie cutter replies to one's questions for the sole purpose of diverting the issues, and overall being insincere and shifting the responsibility of the problem onto the consumer, well, yes, Apple is at the top of the list. The so called "Genius Bar" is useless and its geniusless techs feign ignorance of problems which are listed in the millions on a basic online search. As others have already pointed out, I have been a faithful Apple customer for many years, but the lack of "customer service" (ie: "resolving problems") leads me to say Apple no more.
I had occasion to use customer support this week after my family gifted me with an IPad. I had difficulty with accessing after setting it up. I didn't catch the gentleman's name but I found his explanations way too fast and his tone arrogant, despite my telling him I was a senior and needed patience. I sat through a lengthy discourse on the difference between a password and a postcode, and I remained locked out. I think his telling me to hang up, sit back, relax and meditate and the password would come to me was his giving up. I give the service a zero. Once I can figure out how to reset the thing it will be going back.

My answer for reversing Safari's new rule for blocking autoplaying came to me in a slightly roundabout way. After searching for "videos in safari aren't autoplaying," I only got results about disabling videos from autoplaying. But clicking on the "Stop autoplay videos" result brought me to a page where I saw a link that said "Customize browsing settings per website," which revealed how to change the autoplay settings for specific websites.
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