What does MacTech cover? Each month MacTech provides new content, featuring articles in all areas “tech” related to Apple products (which are all variants of Mac OS X). Just a taste… System administrators, network administrators, IT Pros, and consultants all find MacTech invaluable with articles about solving problems, implementing solutions, or just road testing the latest technologies.
It is this dedication to individualized excellence that has made Mac-Tech a valuable strategic partner to companies and clients on both a national and international level. By combining industry knowledge, offering an established process (that can accommodate changes in the market), and providing systems and technical support and implementation, Mac-Tech always works hard for you and your business.
What does MacTech cover? Each month MacTech provides new content, featuring articles in all areas “tech” related to Apple products (which are all variants of Mac OS X). Just a taste… System administrators, network administrators, IT Pros, and consultants all find MacTech invaluable with articles about solving problems, implementing solutions, or just road testing the latest technologies.

Your MacBook Air comes with 90 days of complimentary technical support and a one-year limited warranty. Purchase AppleCare+ for Mac to extend your coverage to three years from your AppleCare+ purchase date and add up to two incidents of accidental damage coverage, each subject to a service fee of $99 for screen damage or external enclosure damage, or $299 for other repairable damage, plus applicable tax.
For example, I broke my iPhone 7 screen, and Apple was able to do a same-day screen replacement at the Apple store. I don’t have AppleCare+, so Apple charged me the “full” price for the screen repair, which was $129. But if I’d paid $129 for AppleCare+ ahead of time, the repair would cost me $29. That means I actually paid less for the screen repair out of warranty. But if I broke the same iPhone again within the two years, the second $29 screen repair would put me way ahead.
My answer for reversing Safari's new rule for blocking autoplaying came to me in a slightly roundabout way. After searching for "videos in safari aren't autoplaying," I only got results about disabling videos from autoplaying. But clicking on the "Stop autoplay videos" result brought me to a page where I saw a link that said "Customize browsing settings per website," which revealed how to change the autoplay settings for specific websites.
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