Then there is the other part of the MBP with the packages that are sent to your computer without your knowledge that they contain emedded URLs. A collection of the URLs revealed to me the real Apple Cloud is a small group of servers in the Netherlands, not owned by Apple, that get your Cloud data. So if you don't mind your personal data in the cloud going to the Netherlands that should be OK, but of course, Apple won't admit that either.
Then there is the other part of the MBP with the packages that are sent to your computer without your knowledge that they contain emedded URLs. A collection of the URLs revealed to me the real Apple Cloud is a small group of servers in the Netherlands, not owned by Apple, that get your Cloud data. So if you don't mind your personal data in the cloud going to the Netherlands that should be OK, but of course, Apple won't admit that either.
The 11" MacBook Air carried the desirable essential attributes of a netbook, but without the drawbacks of a slower processor and less capable operating system,[52] albeit at a higher price.[53][54][55][56][57] At the low end, Apple introduced the iPad—a different form factor than the netbook, but with improved computing capabilities and lower production cost. Both of these led to a decline in netbook sales, and most PC manufacturers have consequently discontinued their netbook lines in response.[58] Capitalizing on the success of the MacBook Air,[59] Intel promoted Ultrabook as a new high-mobility standard, which has been hailed by some analysts as succeeding where netbooks failed.[60][61][62]
The MacBook Air is a line of Macintosh subnotebook computers developed and manufactured by Apple Inc. It consists of a full-size keyboard, a machined aluminum case, and a thin light structure. The Air is available with a screen size of (measured diagonally) 13.3-inch (33.782 cm), with different specifications produced by Apple. Since 2010, all MacBook Air models have used solid-state drive storage and Intel Core i5 or i7 CPUs.[2] A MacBook Air with an 11.6-inch (29.46 cm) screen was made available in 2010.[3]
When released in October 2010, the 13" model's screen resolution was higher than the average 1366x768 screens of similar sized laptops. However, by mid-2013, with many premium Ultrabooks having high resolution screens (1080p or greater) as standard or upgrades, the MacBook Air has been increasingly criticized for sticking with a low-resolution screen. Many in the tech community had expected Apple to release a MacBook Air with Retina Display by mid-2013, similar to the MacBook Pro Retina which came out in 2012.[78] The October 2013 refresh of the 13" MacBook Pro Retina, with a slimmer chassis and a lower price point, was mentioned as a potential MacBook Air alternative as the battery life is not much shorter while not being considerably bulkier.[4][79] Apple released an entry-level version of the 13" MacBook Pro on October 27, 2016, which was specifically targeted towards MacBook Air users.[80]
It is this dedication to individualized excellence that has made Mac-Tech a valuable strategic partner to companies and clients on both a national and international level. By combining industry knowledge, offering an established process (that can accommodate changes in the market), and providing systems and technical support and implementation, Mac-Tech always works hard for you and your business.
I simply can't say enough about Shiva and his staff at Marin Mac Tech. My main design computer (27" i7) had a hard drive meltdown... and although I back up all client files to my server, there was a ton of stuff on the i7 that hadn't been backed up. Shiva worked miracles and was able to recover most of the data, and got me up and running quickly with a new SSD drive installed with the latest OS X. I'm telling you, if you need a company that knows its $hit and can get the job done for a reasonable cost, Shiva and Marin Mac Tech is the place to go. I'm having them come upgrade my server next week! Five Stars!
Apple is about to begin charging users outside of their warranty for online chat support using a new web payment system it recently developed. Sources familiar with the project say Apple is currently expecting to launch the new paid chat support, which will also let customers schedule repairs and replacements online, as early as next week. Here’s how it works:
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