Come visit our two show rooms, located in Schaumburg, Illinois, and Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Call ahead or feel free to drop by and see our inventory of approximately $500,000 in spare parts. We also inventory a large number of machines, always powered-up and ready-to-go for training, demonstrations, feasibility tests, and whatever else your need may be. We would love to show you around. 
“We had talked about this technology in the past but, frankly, we were skeptical of its fit at CSG. Mac-Tech was competent and prompt with response times, qualities that meshed well with our own core business values. The high part accuracies we achieved with the Ermak press brakes also demonstrated to us Ermaksan’s ability to design and construct a precision machine frame with tier one components.”
Hi John, Thank you for your expertise and, more important, for your kindness because they make me, almost, look forward to my next computer problem. After the next problem comes, I'll be delighted to correspond again with you. I'm told that I excel at programing. But system administration has never been one of my talents. So it's great to have an expert to rely on when the computer decides to stump me. God bless, Bill
The first SLRs had clip-on external light meters, and those meters eventually became standard components. Unfortunately with interchangeable lens cameras, the meter’s coverage only matched the standard lens and perhaps a 35mm wide-angle lens. It wasn’t through-the-lens (TTL) metering, but at least it eliminated the need to carry a separate light meter. The Topcon RE […]
A few days ago I spoke to an Apple customer service rep about getting an adapter. I first went on line to see which one I needed, wasn't sure so I asked for professional help. After twenty minutes, after being on hold for about fifteen minutes, I spoke to someone who didn't seem to have a clue. She put me on hold and then got back on the line to tell me which adapter would work. I needed an adapter for my older printer, so one end had to fit into the back of my new Mac and the other fit the printer plug. The adapter arrived today and it was too small at the computer end. I called Apple back. To make a long story short, I spoke to five people - all of them useless. I was wondering if I was speaking Klingon because nobody seemed to understand that I needed the adapter to plug into the back of my computer and that the other end did fit my printer. They kept assuming that the printer end was the problem. I was passed on to a supervisor who was just as clueless. I was then passed on to someone who was to source the right sized adapter for me and she was the worst of the lot. I can't understand how a company that makes my computer has no idea which adapter I would need for it and after five people, finally one of them realizes that Apple doesn't make them. I got all my other adapters at The Source and they fit perfectly, unfortunately they no longer carry this product. The worst customer service ever and not once did anyone say to me to return this item because I was recommended the wrong size. Not once did anyone offer a refund. I sent the stupid thing back this evening with a note for them to 'stick it where the sun don't shine.' Go anywhere else if you need help with products for your Mac - Apple customer service reps don't have a clue.

If the Messages app is not an option, Apple’s support site has detailed instructions for setting up the Mac for sharing in System Preferences and using alternative screen-sharing methods or iCloud’s Back to My Mac feature (until Back to My Mac is discontinued in the next version of the operating system). If you are remotely trying to configure settings on someone else’s Mac and you both have iOS devices, Apple’s FaceTime video chat app can be helpful for visual cues walking someone through setup steps; Microsoft Skype users can also share screens for visual reference.
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A Technical Support Incident (TSI) is a request for code-level support for Apple frameworks, APIs, and tools, and is available to members of the Apple Developer Program, Apple Developer Enterprise Program, and MFi Program. Submit a TSI if you cannot fix a bug, have trouble implementing a specific technology, or have other questions about your code. Your incident will be assigned to a Developer Technical Support engineer who can help troubleshoot your code or investigate possible workarounds to fast-track your development. Support is provided in English via email, typically within three business days.


Much like Apple handles support calls over the phone, soon only customers within their warranty period will be able to access online chat support through getsupport.apple.com for free. For others, Apple will charge what it refers to as a “pay per incident” fee or require the purchase of an extended warranty through AppleCare. Previously all online support chat features were available for free to users worldwide. Some users might have noticed back in August when Apple revamped its support sites that it started listing a $19.99 per incident fee for chat support. However, up until now AppleCare hasn’t actually been charging users to access the feature.

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