On July 20, 2011, Apple released updates to the 11.6" and 13.3" models of the MacBook Air, which also became Apple's entry-level laptops due to lowered prices and the discontinuation of the white MacBook around the same time.[5] The mid-2011 MacBook Airs were powered by the new Sandy Bridge 1.6 or 1.7 GHz dual-core Intel Core i5, or 1.8 GHz dual-core Intel Core i7 processors, that came with an Intel HD Graphics 3000 processor, and with a backlit keyboard, two USB 2.0 ports, FaceTime camera, a standard of 2 GB of RAM (configurable up to 4 GB), Thunderbolt which shares function with Mini DisplayPort and Bluetooth was upgraded to v4.0.[36][37] Maximum SSD flash memory storage options were increased up to 256 GB. Both 11" and 13" models had an analog audio output/headphone minijack (that also supports an iPhone/iPod touch headset with microphone), but only the 13" model had an integrated SDXC-capable SD Card slot. These models use a less expensive "Eagle Ridge" Thunderbolt controller that provides two Thunderbolt channels (2 × 10 Gbit/s bidirectional), compared to the MacBook Pro which uses a "Light Ridge" controller that provides four Thunderbolt channels (4 × 10 Gbit/s bidirectional). A USB ethernet adapter was immediately available upon release and a Thunderbolt-to-Firewire 800 adapter became available in mid-year 2012.

DO NOT USE this company! Complete false advertising. They quoted me saying the work would cost a maximum of $500, and wouldn't do any work unless they had my permission first. They did the work and then the bill came to over $1,000. I did not pay and then they threatened to take it to collections. They didn't even have my signature on any kind of contract. I was so irritated with the whole process after they hounded me with calls and texts, that I finally paid them almost $500, for basically nothing. DO NOT WASTE YOUR TIME AND MONEY with this company. I suggest going elsewhere.
At the launch of the MacBook Air in January 2008, Apple claimed it to be the thinnest laptop in the world. While this was true of laptops on sale at the time, the 2003 Sharp Actius MM10 Muramasas was thinner at some points than the Macbook Air, being 0.54 inches (14 mm) thick at its minimum.[24] It, like the MacBook Air, was a tapered design, with a maximum height of 0.78 inches (19.8 mm) —slightly thicker than the MacBook Air — shown above as 0.76 inches (19.3 mm).[25] The Sony Vaio X505, released in 2004, had a minimum thickness of 0.38 inches (10 mm) and a maximum of 0.8 inches (20.3 mm).[26]
No! Well, AppleCare+ plans for iPhone and iPad purchased in the United States and Canada are only valid in the United States and Canada, but other Apple devices (Apple Watch, Mac, iPod, Apple TV, and Apple displays) provide global coverage. Service options do vary between countries, but any AppleCare service is always performed by authorized techs with genuine Apple parts.
The 11" MacBook Air carried the desirable essential attributes of a netbook, but without the drawbacks of a slower processor and less capable operating system,[52] albeit at a higher price.[53][54][55][56][57] At the low end, Apple introduced the iPad—a different form factor than the netbook, but with improved computing capabilities and lower production cost. Both of these led to a decline in netbook sales, and most PC manufacturers have consequently discontinued their netbook lines in response.[58] Capitalizing on the success of the MacBook Air,[59] Intel promoted Ultrabook as a new high-mobility standard, which has been hailed by some analysts as succeeding where netbooks failed.[60][61][62]
Still, to buy AppleCare+ after the fact you generally have to run a diagnostic test on the device in question, so Apple knows it’s in good working order. And no matter when you buy your AppleCare+ plan, the coverage starts from the day you bought your device. So you don’t get an “extra” two months of coverage if you wait two months to buy the plan.
Hurray for competent people and a well-run small company!  I went to Yelp to find someone to help me clean up my Mac and advise me on how to improve performance.  I was pretty much expecting to be told my iMac was too old to work with...but no.  Shiva comes exactly on time and says "No problem.  Great machine...just needs extra space".  Hurray!  Also advises on improvements to overall Wifi, etc. that MMT does not receive any profit from, and provides the resources on where to get best price.  When there are the usual followup questions after my Mac has a bigger brain, I get immediate responses to my texts and remote support that gets all straightened out in no time.  I would absolutely recommend them and so glad I made the "preventive" appointment before having a total system crash.  Will follow any advice they provide from now on.
Through July 1, 2013, the MacBook Air took in 56 percent of all Ultrabook sales in the United States, despite being one of the higher-priced competitors. [66] Apple had previously dominated the premium PC market, in 2009 having a 91 percent market share for PCs priced at more than $1,000, according to NPD, and Ultrabooks were an attempt by other PC manufacturers to move in on Apple's turf.[67] While Apple's MacBook lines were not immune to this consumer trend towards mobile devices,[68] they still managed to ship 2.8 million MacBooks in Q2 2012 (the majority of which were the MacBook Air) compared to 500,000 total Ultrabooks,[69][70] despite there being dozens of Ultrabooks from various manufacturers on the market while Apple only offered 11" and 13" models of the Macbook Air.[71] Forrester Research analyst Frank Gillett attributes Apple's increased success in the enterprise market to the 2010 MacBook Air and the iPad.[72]
Apple's phone-based tech support provided accurate answers in a speedy process, though I encountered an odd bug during my testing. Apple's phone support number (1-800-275-2273) isn't highly visible on the company's site, so most people will find themselves navigating to http://support.apple.com, and then clicking through a short series of prompts and filling in contact information to arrange a phone call.
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