We don't know why the support.apple.com site glitched out on multiple occasions, but we were happy to see the issue disappear by our third call. If Apple wants an even better score next year, we'd suggest its agents find footing on Facebook, and make sure its employees know all the ins and outs of its latest features so that callers aren't put on hold while techs investigate.

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On July 20, 2011, Apple released updates to the 11.6" and 13.3" models of the MacBook Air, which also became Apple's entry-level laptops due to lowered prices and the discontinuation of the white MacBook around the same time.[5] The mid-2011 MacBook Airs were powered by the new Sandy Bridge 1.6 or 1.7 GHz dual-core Intel Core i5, or 1.8 GHz dual-core Intel Core i7 processors, that came with an Intel HD Graphics 3000 processor, and with a backlit keyboard, two USB 2.0 ports, FaceTime camera, a standard of 2 GB of RAM (configurable up to 4 GB), Thunderbolt which shares function with Mini DisplayPort and Bluetooth was upgraded to v4.0.[36][37] Maximum SSD flash memory storage options were increased up to 256 GB. Both 11" and 13" models had an analog audio output/headphone minijack (that also supports an iPhone/iPod touch headset with microphone), but only the 13" model had an integrated SDXC-capable SD Card slot. These models use a less expensive "Eagle Ridge" Thunderbolt controller that provides two Thunderbolt channels (2 × 10 Gbit/s bidirectional), compared to the MacBook Pro which uses a "Light Ridge" controller that provides four Thunderbolt channels (4 × 10 Gbit/s bidirectional). A USB ethernet adapter was immediately available upon release and a Thunderbolt-to-Firewire 800 adapter became available in mid-year 2012.
5d Crashing if I minimize or switch windows Hello, Whenever I switch screens or minimize wow at all, when I come back the came has completely crashed (mouse turns into the little spin wheel). I then need to force quit the program and restart it. I have tried to reset my game options on the Blizzard app, does anyone have any other suggestions for me about how I can remedy this? Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thank you!Båloo4 5d
Nov 11 Screen sleep -> WoW dies I've noticed that when I go AFK long enough that the screen is put to sleep, upon waking up, WoW is unresponsive. It's not even possible to alt-tab out or force quit it. I have to try to keyboard restart the Mac and wait for WoW to fail to force quit. This never happened with true fullscreen, because that mode prevented the screen from sleeping.Azreluna4 Nov 11

It's time to get some Air. The ultra-slim, lightweight MacBook Air features a fast Intel Core i5 processor and 128GB flash storage drive for quick booting and file retrieval. Whether you're streaming movies, creating documents or surfing the web, everything looks better on the high-definition screen. Plus, Wi-Fi AC ensures you stay in the fast lane of the information superhighway. When speed counts, reach for the Air!


The MacBook Air is a line of Macintosh subnotebook computers developed and manufactured by Apple Inc. It consists of a full-size keyboard, a machined aluminum case, and a thin light structure. The Air is available with a screen size of (measured diagonally) 13.3-inch (33.782 cm), with different specifications produced by Apple. Since 2010, all MacBook Air models have used solid-state drive storage and Intel Core i5 or i7 CPUs.[2] A MacBook Air with an 11.6-inch (29.46 cm) screen was made available in 2010.[3]
Before rolling out the paid chat support, Apple had to develop a new web payment system that would allow it to accept payments through chat and keep user info secure when transferred between support agents, according to our sources. Using the new web payment system, we’re told Apple plans to offer the ability to set up hardware repairs and replacements that require a hold on a credit card or pay per incident fee via chat support. Rather than having to call in, users will be sent a link that’s live for 24 hours in order to complete the payment.
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