The person on the other end of the sharing request needs to accept your offer. A box pops up to ask that person to let you observe or take command of the screen. Once the person chooses “Control my screen” and clicks Accept, you should be able to take over that Mac with your own cursor and keyboard to provide remote technical support; the app also opens up an audio call between you and the other person so you can talk while you help. When you are finished, the recipient can close the session.
The use of AppleCare Technician Training materials and the successful completion of Apple Service Certification exams do not imply any authorization by Apple to perform repairs or to conduct business directly with Apple or on its behalf. Results from Apple Service Certification exams are used by Apple Authorized Service Providers to assess the competence of repair technicians seeking employment in servicing Apple computers and selected peripherals.
My laptop was so slow, it would have improved my life more being used as a door stop. I didn't want to give up on her though and buy a new one. I wanted to avoid the hell that is the Apple store and Marin Mac Tech was the first to appear in a search; it was one of those times when the universe aligns perfectly. I feel so lucky to have had Shiva work on my 2011 Macbook Pro! It's becoming increasingly rare to find someone passionate about the professional service they provide, this is not the case with Shiva, his thorough knowledge and passion for craft assured me that my computer was in very capable hands. After a hard drive replacement and service, my computer is running better and faster than ever! I am so happy. Thank you .Thank you. thank you. I will be referring my clients and everyone I know to Shiva and Marin Mac Tech.
We are your certified tech support professionals available 24/7 with experts on PC computers, Apple products, Macs, Androids, Tablets (ipads) and your other IT related tech products. Pros Tech Support provides unlimited virus removal and computer tune-ups to keep your devices working at peak performance.Plus you’ll get Internet Security Software to stay virus-free and keep your personal information safe and secure.
Nov 6 mojave causing wow to crash I've been playing since release, and upgraded to Mojave last night. Wow crashes every 5 minutes now. (The screen freezes and the "rainbow wheel of death" happens. I have to force-quit) Graphics set to minimum, all addons are updated, and im using a 27 inch late 2013 imac dektop with 8 gigs of ram. Anyone else have this problem?Axiss17 Nov 6
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The Microsoft Surface Pro has a similar size and price to the 11" MacBook Air;[74][75] Apple CEO Tim Cook has criticized the Surface Pro and other Ultrabook hybrids running the touch-based Windows 8, that attempt to combine laptop and tablet functionality in one device, saying that such devices were confusing like trying to "combine a fridge and a toaster".[76][77]
What does MacTech cover? Each month MacTech provides new content, featuring articles in all areas “tech” related to Apple products (which are all variants of Mac OS X). Just a taste… System administrators, network administrators, IT Pros, and consultants all find MacTech invaluable with articles about solving problems, implementing solutions, or just road testing the latest technologies.

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Because Apple makes the hardware, operating system, and many applications for every Apple product, AppleCare for Enterprise delivers integrated support and service you can’t get anywhere else. You’ll get IT department–level support by phone or email for all Apple hardware and software. We’ll provide support for complex deployment and integration scenarios, including MDM and Active Directory. And if you need help with IBM MobileFirst for iOS apps, we’ll help troubleshoot your solution and work with IBM to get your issue resolved.

The first time you install Malwarebytes, you’re given a free 14-day trial of the premium edition, which includes preventative tools like real-time scanning and specific protection from ransomware. After two weeks, it automatically reverts to the basic free version that will detect and clean up malware infections only when you run a scan. It is important to note that Malwarebytes will run alongside antivirus software without conflicts.
Jan 18 Upcoming API / Hardware Support Changes Hi Friends, We have seen quite a few threads with people upset and confused about the new warnings in the Blizzard app. Warnings that tell you that your system will be unsupported soon. While this is true in some cases, I would like to provide some resources and advice on how to see if you will still be able to play. Here is a list of requirements and resources to help you find out the state of your computer. OS requirements:   Mac - Users computers will need to support the Metal API. A list of Mac computers that can support Metal . Users should also be on a supported macOS. macOS 10.12.X macOS 10.13.x *macOS 10.14.x *(macOS may not be released by the time these changes go live )*   Windows - Users will need to be on the following OS builds, with the 64 bit version installed, and able to support DirectX11. Windows 7 Sp1 Windows 8.1 Windows 10 How to check if you are on a 64 bit OS. 1. Hit Windows key 2. Type “my computer” 3. Right click this PC or the name you gave it 4. Select Properties 5. Look at System type ( You will want 64 bit Operating system listed here ) How to see if your Video card supports DirectX 11. This list is not up to date but if you have a card that is newer than the ones listed, it is likely okay. You can check on the manufacture's website to be sure.   Additional information - We have seen cases where having the in game settings changed to DirectX 9 or WoW set to launch in 32 bit mode will cause these errors. To check if World of Warcraft in 32-bit mode from the Blizzard App 1) Open the Blizzard App 2) Select World of Warcraft 3) Click Options 4) Select Game Settings on the left 5) Uncheck Launch 32-bit client (Instead of 64-bit) 6) Click Done How to disable DirectX 9 if you can. 1) Click Red Question mark in game 2) Go to system 3) Go to Advanced 4) Click Drop down by Graphics API 5) Select DirectX 11 6) Restart the game I hope this information helps my friends and hope you have a wonderful time in World of Warcraft. /NathardrickNathardrick0 Jan 18
Hardware technologies and standards are blossoming at Apple. Not too surprising, Apple is a hardware company and it had never been timid about taking the lead in emerging hardware technologies. MacTech delves deeper into these standards and technologies with an eye to their application to Apple techs of all kinds.Each issue of MacTech provides how-to articles, regular features, industry news, conference reports, product reviews, the latest in shortcuts and insider secrets, and full source code listings available.
Called them and left a message on a Thursday about a month ago.  I also emailed the same day using their website form, indicating the specific issues I was having (model, OS, RAM, etc.).  The next day I got a return call from their admin saying only that someone would come to my house and it would cost $140 ($150?) for an hour.  Told her I had emailed with the specifics, and I asked to speak with a technical person for a few minutes first, to get their view on my issues, whether they could solve it, and if so, how long it might take.  She assured me I would be contacted.  I received no reply to my email and no call.
6d WoW Performance Guide For Macs - Patch 8.0 The World of Warcraft Performance Guide For Macs - Battle For Azeroth - Updated 08/21/2018 Introduction & Personal Notes Hello everyone and welcome to my WoW Performance Guide For Macs! The Burning Legion has been defeated... again... but at a dire cost. The very heart of Azeroth is in need of healing but the denizens of said planet are now caught in a struggle for control of the very planetary resources needed to heal it! Now we must prepare for the impending Battle For Azeroth. It's been quite the rollercoaster the last few years hasn't it? Both in terms of the lore and the technical aspects of the game. Sadly Patch 8.0 does not buck this up-and-down trend, and we are again at something of a low point. We've lost a lot and gained very little. Patch 8.0 brings us a lot of new features like a much-advanced engine running on the Metal API, but we've lost the ability to run the game in fullscreen. I'm told that the loss of fullscreen is actually due to a deficiency of DirectX 12 on Windows, but for whatever reason, Blizzard has chosen to maintain the Mac and Windows build of the game in such a way that keeping parity means forcing the Mac build of the game to lose fullscreen as well. Don't quote me on this as I'm only hearing about this 2nd hand, but that's what I've been told. Regardless of the reason for losing fullscreen mode, the fact that it's gone means that we as players have to do quite a bit more work on our end to get the game running smoothly on our Macs. This loss of fullscreen has had a lot of ripple effects that negatively impact a lot of people's ability to play the game outright. I'm sorry, but that's just the way it is right now. With that said, if you're logging in for the first time since BFA launched, and you're wondering why the game runs so much worse at the same settings, I'd like to remind everyone that because of general upgrades to the textures and graphics, the settings you used in Legion will actually now be a notch or two lower than they are now. So if you were playing the game at the "7" preset, you'll want to run it at 5 now to maintain the same overall settings. On top of that, the loss of fullscreen means we have to do some drastic tweaking to change the game's resolution. In short, it's actually impossible to play at the exact same settings you had in Legion. All of the old resolution options have been removed. So comparing the two is like comparing apples and oranges. The Settings: A Precursor If you only read part of this guide, this is the part you should probably read. The vast majority of Macs that Apple now sells include what Apple dubs "Retina Displays". This is just Apple's marketing term for putting very high resolution monitors in their Macs, and then using software trickery to scale and enlarge the images on those screens so they're not too tiny to read, despite the very high resolution being displayed. On a standard desktop, this makes images and text nice and crisp to read. The problem is that Apple pairs those displays with relatively weak graphics cards or "GPUs", which is what renders all the pretty graphics on the screen. With Retina Displays now standard on virtually all Macs made within the last several years, I need to point out the most crucial thing of this entire guide. Not a single Mac on the market has a GPU powerful enough to play games at native resolutions. This has become even more crucial in BFA with fullscreen mode now removed from the game. The loss of fullscreen in addition to Apple's implementation of Retina scaling has made things very difficult for us to run the game smoothly without it looking pixelated or fuzzy. As an explanation, the 15" Macbook Pro has a 2880x1880 resolution display, and the 27" iMac has a 5120x2880 "5k" resolution display. Neither of these Macs have GPUs anywhere near powerful enough to play games at these resolutions. Even a GTX 1080Ti, one of the most powerful graphics cards available, struggles to play games at "5k", and the GPUs in these Macs aren't even close to that. The only GPU that could come close is the Vega GPU in the iMac Pro. Worse still, the baseline 21" iMac, the 13" Macbook Pro, the Macbook Air, the standard Macbook, and the Mac Mini all use Intel integrated graphics instead of dedicated GPUs. So playing games at reasonable resolutions like 1920x1080 "1080p" is difficult even at modest settings on these lower end machines. Let alone at the much higher "Retina Display" resolutions. In layman's terms, if the graphics listing has "Intel" in the name, it sucks. It's an integrated graphics solution bolted onto the CPU, and is NOT a dedicated graphics card. Intel doesn't even make dedicated GPUs. So if it has Intel on it, just assume it's barely capable of minimum settings. WoW will run, but not well and it'll look like garbage. The Settings: External User Tweaks I would read this next part too if I were you. If you're on a Mac that has a Retina Display, the game will now choose to always run at a specific very high resolution regardless of what you set the scaling to in your System Preferences>Display settings. And as I stated in the section above, this resolution is probably way too high for your poor graphics card to handle. There are now two main ways to deal with this: - Set the in-game Resolution Scale down to something lower than 100%. - Run the game in "low resolution mode". To do this, close WoW, open a Finder window, navigate to the directory WoW is Installed to (usually "Macintosh HD/Applications/World of Warcraft"), right-click (command-click) on the WoW.app executable itself (Not the WoW Launcher), and click "Get Info". In the new "Get Info" window that pops up, tick the "Open in Low Resolution Mode" checkbox. WoW will now open at the same resolution as what the System Preferences>Display panel says your screen "looks like". From here on, you can open WoW normally from the launcher's "Play" button. The main differences between the two options are as follows: Running the game at native resolution and adjusting the resolution scaling lets you keep UI elements like your unit frames and action bars sharp while making the actual game world more or less pixelated. In contrast, running the game in low resolution mode will make everything, including the action bars, slightly more pixelated. But not as overall drastically so as lowering the resolution scaling does. Either way, it's a trade off from what we had in Legion. Personally I think running the game in low resolution mode looks and runs better on my personal Macbook Pro, but do whatever you think works best for you. Let's use my Late 2016 Macbook Pro with a Radeon Pro 460 Polaris GPU as an example: ... As you can see, I've generally kept my settings on the modest side for my Macbook Pro. I've disabled some of the more demanding settings like Sunshafts and SSAO. Another thing you might have noticed is that I'm running the game at 1920x1200, which implies that I've already set the game to run in low resolution mode as described in the section above instead of opting to run the game at native resolution and just adjust the resolution scale accordingly. Ultimately it's up to you to fiddle with the settings and decide what you're most comfortable with. The Settings: Explained Graphics > Display Display Mode: This lets you choose between running the game within a window on the desktop, or to fill up the screen while running in a borderless window. Resolution Scale: Also known as DSR, super sampling, or "SSAA", resolution scaling is basically a slider that adjusts the “internal resolution” of the game. Setting this to 200% will literally render the game at 200% of the game’s current resolution, and then downscale it to match your monitor. Gamers with extremely high end gaming rigs like to crank this up as a form of Anti-Aliasing to help smooth out edges of textures and generally make the game look better, but this has by far the single biggest impact on the performance of the game. If you’re on a 4k iMac and set this to 200%, you’re essentially running the game at 8k resolution. So unless you’ve somehow modified your Mac to have an industrial grade GPU, never set this above 100%. You can even decrease below 100% it if you want a little more performance out of the game at the cost of graphical fidelity. Extreme performance impact. Anti-Aliasing: As the in-game tool-tip says, it is a graphics filter used to smooth out jagged edges. In general, the severity of visible jagged edges changes drastically depending on the game and the graphics engine used to display it. The different types of AA listed are shown in order from the least taxing/worst quality to the most taxing/best quality, from top to bottom. Describing each type of AA goes beyond the scope of this guide, but suffice it to say, MSAA is generally the best compromise between quality and performance. FXAA is a sort of lens filter that overlays the entire screen after the game has already been rendered, and acts as a post-render effect, blurring everything including the UI elements like action bars. MSAA is added during the rendering of each frame, and only smooths out the edges of textures. As described above, SSAA is an extremely taxing method of AA that renders the AA at a much higher resolution, then downscales it to match your game’s current resolution. It’s by far the best type of AA, but it kills most graphics cards. For more info on the types of AA, go here: http://pcgamingwiki.com/wiki/Glossary:Anti-aliasing_(AA) Moderate to High performance impact. Use MSAA 2x for best balance. Vertical Sync: Vertical Sync aims to reduce the amount of "screen tearing" that occurs when the game's frame rate drops out of sync with the monitor's refresh rate. The result is a more fluid image at all times. The trade off is that it does this by limiting the game's frame rate to a multiple fraction of the screen's refresh rate. So if you have a 60Hz monitor (as most all Macs do) and the game's running at 60fps, but then drops below 60fps for whatever reason, V-Sync will instantly drop the game's frame rate down to a divisible fraction of 60fps, such as 30fps as opposed to 59fps, to avoid tearing. This can sometimes throw players off if they're not expecting the sudden drop and jitteriness in motion animation. Use whatever your eyes are most comfortable looking at. Graphics > Base Settings > Graphics Quality: This slider is an overall preset function that collectively tries to adjust every setting at once. Personally I'm more inclined to sewt it to "custom" and tune each and every setting manually. Graphics > Textures Texture Resolution: Changes the sharpness of the in-game textures like flooring, player armor, NPC skins, etc. Setting this higher doesn't require much more raw processing power from your GPU, but it does require more video memory, or VRAM. So if two video cards had 256MB of VRAM, and another had 4GB of VRAM, but the video cards were otherwise completely identical, the 4GB card would be able to load much higher resolution textures with zero performance loss because it can simply hold more in it’s memory. Think of VRAM as your video card’’s stamina. Trying to load textures on a card that doesn't have the VRAM for it will force the card to keep switching out textures in order to display them, and will generally cause the game to stutter as you move and pan the camera as it tries to load the textures it needs. Performance based directly on the amount of video memory your video card has. Texture Filtering: A filter used to enhance the sharpness of textures, as opposed to just the edges. Lowering this will increase performance, but very few modern GPUs have trouble with 16x TF anymore. Minimal performance impact. Projected Textures: This enables the projection of certain textures, like spell effects, onto the game's terrain and other object surfaces. Turning this off can drastically improve performance, especially on mobile GPUs where pipeline bandwidth (The GPU's ability to process multiple instructions to and from the CPU at once) is limited. Moderate to high performance impact. Graphics > Environment View Distance: Increases and decreases the point at which distant objects change from being flat decals to rendered, textured objects. This has a profound impact on game performance, especially in newer zones from more recent expansions, where the game's textures are much higher resolution than older zones. This uses both raw GPU power and VRAM. The higher the setting, the more the GPU has to render at once. High to extreme performance impact. Environmental Detail: This is essentially View Distance for grass. It changes the distance at which grass and other minor ground objects, like pebbles, are rendered. AMD video cards are less affected by this setting than nVidia cards are. nVidia cards have a harder time with it. Minimal to Moderate performance impact, depending on video card. Ground Clutter: Changes the density of ground clutter, like grass and pebbles. The higher the setting, the denser the grass becomes. Like Environmental Detail, nVidia cards have a harder time with it than AMD cards. Mild to Moderate performance impact. Graphics > Effects Note: Some of the following effects may be disabled completely on some lower end graphics hardware. Shadow Quality: Changes the amount of shadows rendered in the game, as well as how many layers of shadows are allowed to stack on one another. This can have a dramatic affect on performance. And in fact, Shadows has been bugged in WoW for years. High and Ultra shadows are a LOT more demanding than they should be. I personally recommend keeping Shadows to "good" on all but the highest end systems. High performance impact. Liquid Detail: Changes the water effects in the game. Low uses the old water maps from Classic WoW, while Fair and higher use the new liquid maps from Cataclysm onwards. Again, High and Ultra have a pretty large impact on game performance, especially on lower end cards. I'd keep this on "Good" unless you have a higher end Mac. Moderate to High performance impact. Sunshafts: Changes the sun's ability to shine down on objects. Again, this setting is currently bugged, and requires a lot more power to run than it really should. Keep this on "Good" or lower. Moderate to High performance impact. Particle Density: Changes the density of spells and effects. For example, on Low, a Mage's Blizzard spell might drop 20 icicles. But on Ultra, the same spell will drop 100. This setting has the most impact in raids where lots of players are casting many spells at once. If you're in a raid and suddenly need to lower your settings, this is a good one to start with. Moderate to High performance impact, depending on situation. SSAO: SSAO, or Screen-Space Ambient Occlusion is an algorithm that approximates ambient lighting. Most noticeable indoors. Higher settings add more ambient lights, and render existing ones more accurately. As with Sunshafts, SSAO is somewhat bugged, and requires more power than it should. Moderate to High performance impact. Depth Effects: Controls the depth of certain particle effects. Moderate performance impact. Lighting Quality: Changes how accurate lighting effects are rendered, and the quality of the effect. Moderate performance impact. Outline Mode: Adds colored outlines around NPCs and players alike based on faction reputation. Moderate performance impact. Epilogue Well there we have it folks. The complete updated guide for World of Warcraft: Battle For Azeroth. I hope you all had as much fun reading it as I did writing it. See you in the impending war! 3-B. Past Changes - 08/21/18: Major revisions for launch of BFA. - 09/06/17: Rewrite for major changes in patch 7.3. - 07/20/16: Major rewrite for Legion. - 10/23/14: Total revamp for WoD in light of new Retina Macs. - 10/17/13: Changed the format of the guide completely. - 03/21/12: Added Late 2011 Mac Models, updated to represent 64-bit performance. - 04/22/11: Added Late 2010 Macbook Air, notes on integrated graphics. - 12/14/10: Updated for Cataclysm, lowering some settings to accommodate slow performance. - 10/14/10: Revamped settings for new graphics interface. Removed older Mac Models. - 04/28/10: Added newest Mac models, revamped settings to uniform 60fps across all models. - 02/12/10: Revised, condensed, and corrected small typos. - 12/01/09: Added Snow Leopard and newest Mac models. Removed PowerPC Macs. - 04/21/09: Updated settings to match the new scheme in patch 3.1. - 03/13/09: Added early 2009 Mac models. - 11/20/08: Updated new information after Wrath of The Lich King launched. - 10/08/08: Complete & utter overhaul in preparation for WoTLK. - 03/30/08: Updated findings for patch 2.4. - 02/13/08: Added details concerning the OS X 10.5.2 Leopard Graphics Update. - 02/07/08: Included PowerPC G4, G5, and newest Core 2 models.Stoneblade389 6d
MacBook Air is portable and light weight device made available users. Apple updated their MacBook subsequently and launched MacBook Air. MacBook air is compact, slim and more powerful than existing Mac. More powerful processor, turbo boost LED backlit widescreen display, multi-touch track pad, Intel HD graphics and many more advanced features distinguish from MacBook. For any kind of issues an error or problem-related to Apple MacBook Air Technical Support can be dealt easily under right technicians.
Included with each enrollment are two Technical Support Incidents, which will expire at the end of your membership year. You will receive two new TSIs when you renew your membership. Additional TSIs are available for purchase in either a 2-pack for $99 USD or 5-Pack for $249 USD in the Code-level Support section in your account. TSIs purchased separately expire one year from the date of activation.
Marin Mac Tech used to offer efficient reliable service, but the last few times I've used his service, he has seemed much more interested in padding his bill and selling me unnecessary expensive gear.  This most recent experience was the worst.  Took in my NAS, ran up a large bill running diagnostic tests, told me it was the power supply, I ordered a new power supply, tells me it's still broken and now I should buy a very expensive one from him.  Ridiculous.  Not sure what happened to cause this slide.
My laptop died awhile back and although I have a Mac desktop and an iPad Mini, the time arrived for me to get a laptop. This time around I chose to get an Apple MacBook to bring all my Apple products together. It's really how they're all connected and share information across devices leaving me not having to send a copy to my email so that I can then open on my iPhone, Apple watch, iPad, or whatever. Now, everything is all connected instantaneously. I'm thrilled I went for the MacBook Air!
Nov 11 Crashing game in dungeon I joined a group in dungeon finder for Waycrest Manor, and as soon as I joined the instance, my game crashed. I tried to log back on to the game, and it would crash again. Also, when I joined the character and the instance appeared for a few seconds, I noticed that my icon in the corner isn't even mine. Does anyone know how to get out of the dungeon so I won't be stuck in it? Thanks!Demaxia1 Nov 11
No! Well, AppleCare+ plans for iPhone and iPad purchased in the United States and Canada are only valid in the United States and Canada, but other Apple devices (Apple Watch, Mac, iPod, Apple TV, and Apple displays) provide global coverage. Service options do vary between countries, but any AppleCare service is always performed by authorized techs with genuine Apple parts.
A Technical Support Incident (TSI) is a request for code-level support for Apple frameworks, APIs, and tools, and is available to members of the Apple Developer Program, Apple Developer Enterprise Program, and MFi Program. Submit a TSI if you cannot fix a bug, have trouble implementing a specific technology, or have other questions about your code. Your incident will be assigned to a Developer Technical Support engineer who can help troubleshoot your code or investigate possible workarounds to fast-track your development. Support is provided in English via email, typically within three business days.
Nov 2 New MacBook Pros Announced at October Even Will be upgradeable to Vega 16 and 20 GPUs https://www.google.com/amp/s/arstechnica.com/gadgets/2018/10/apple-to-offer-macbook-pros-with-amd-vega-graphics-starting-in-november/%3famp=1 Was wondering how that would translate to playing WOW - how much would one be able to push the graphics at native resolution with those cards and get smooth FPS? Thanks!Dileo8 Nov 2
Steve Jobs introduced the first MacBook Air during a speech at his keynote at the 2008 Macworld conference held on January 15, 2008.[6] The first-generation MacBook Air was a 13.3"-only model, initially promoted as the world's thinnest notebook[7] (1.94cm MacBook may be compared with 1.98cm for a previous record model, 2005's Toshiba Portege R200[8]). It featured a custom[9] Intel Merom CPU and Intel GMA graphics. In late 2008, the CPU was updated to a faster, non-custom Penryn CPU and integrated Nvidia GeForce graphics while the hard drive capacity was increased and the micro-DVI video port was replaced by the Mini DisplayPort.[10] A mid-2009 refresh, introduced alongside the MacBook Pro family, featured a slightly higher-capacity battery, and a faster Penryn CPU.[11]
Following its introduction, the MacBook Air was greeted with a mixed reception. The portability of the MacBook Air was praised in reviews, but the compromise in features was criticized.[17][18][19] The full-sized keyboard, weight, thinness, and Multi-Touch trackpad were appreciated in reviews, while the limited configuration options and ports, slow speed (in non-SSD models), non-user-replaceable battery, small hard drive, and price were criticized.[17][18] The flip-down hatch on the side of the original MacBook Air is a tight fit for some headphone plugs and USB devices, requiring users to purchase an extension cable. Apple removed the flip-down hatch on the late 2010 model in favor of open connection ports, as is the case with most other laptops.[20][21]
6d WoW Performance Guide For Macs - Patch 8.0 The World of Warcraft Performance Guide For Macs - Battle For Azeroth - Updated 08/21/2018 Introduction & Personal Notes Hello everyone and welcome to my WoW Performance Guide For Macs! The Burning Legion has been defeated... again... but at a dire cost. The very heart of Azeroth is in need of healing but the denizens of said planet are now caught in a struggle for control of the very planetary resources needed to heal it! Now we must prepare for the impending Battle For Azeroth. It's been quite the rollercoaster the last few years hasn't it? Both in terms of the lore and the technical aspects of the game. Sadly Patch 8.0 does not buck this up-and-down trend, and we are again at something of a low point. We've lost a lot and gained very little. Patch 8.0 brings us a lot of new features like a much-advanced engine running on the Metal API, but we've lost the ability to run the game in fullscreen. I'm told that the loss of fullscreen is actually due to a deficiency of DirectX 12 on Windows, but for whatever reason, Blizzard has chosen to maintain the Mac and Windows build of the game in such a way that keeping parity means forcing the Mac build of the game to lose fullscreen as well. Don't quote me on this as I'm only hearing about this 2nd hand, but that's what I've been told. Regardless of the reason for losing fullscreen mode, the fact that it's gone means that we as players have to do quite a bit more work on our end to get the game running smoothly on our Macs. This loss of fullscreen has had a lot of ripple effects that negatively impact a lot of people's ability to play the game outright. I'm sorry, but that's just the way it is right now. With that said, if you're logging in for the first time since BFA launched, and you're wondering why the game runs so much worse at the same settings, I'd like to remind everyone that because of general upgrades to the textures and graphics, the settings you used in Legion will actually now be a notch or two lower than they are now. So if you were playing the game at the "7" preset, you'll want to run it at 5 now to maintain the same overall settings. On top of that, the loss of fullscreen means we have to do some drastic tweaking to change the game's resolution. In short, it's actually impossible to play at the exact same settings you had in Legion. All of the old resolution options have been removed. So comparing the two is like comparing apples and oranges. The Settings: A Precursor If you only read part of this guide, this is the part you should probably read. The vast majority of Macs that Apple now sells include what Apple dubs "Retina Displays". This is just Apple's marketing term for putting very high resolution monitors in their Macs, and then using software trickery to scale and enlarge the images on those screens so they're not too tiny to read, despite the very high resolution being displayed. On a standard desktop, this makes images and text nice and crisp to read. The problem is that Apple pairs those displays with relatively weak graphics cards or "GPUs", which is what renders all the pretty graphics on the screen. With Retina Displays now standard on virtually all Macs made within the last several years, I need to point out the most crucial thing of this entire guide. Not a single Mac on the market has a GPU powerful enough to play games at native resolutions. This has become even more crucial in BFA with fullscreen mode now removed from the game. The loss of fullscreen in addition to Apple's implementation of Retina scaling has made things very difficult for us to run the game smoothly without it looking pixelated or fuzzy. As an explanation, the 15" Macbook Pro has a 2880x1880 resolution display, and the 27" iMac has a 5120x2880 "5k" resolution display. Neither of these Macs have GPUs anywhere near powerful enough to play games at these resolutions. Even a GTX 1080Ti, one of the most powerful graphics cards available, struggles to play games at "5k", and the GPUs in these Macs aren't even close to that. The only GPU that could come close is the Vega GPU in the iMac Pro. Worse still, the baseline 21" iMac, the 13" Macbook Pro, the Macbook Air, the standard Macbook, and the Mac Mini all use Intel integrated graphics instead of dedicated GPUs. So playing games at reasonable resolutions like 1920x1080 "1080p" is difficult even at modest settings on these lower end machines. Let alone at the much higher "Retina Display" resolutions. In layman's terms, if the graphics listing has "Intel" in the name, it sucks. It's an integrated graphics solution bolted onto the CPU, and is NOT a dedicated graphics card. Intel doesn't even make dedicated GPUs. So if it has Intel on it, just assume it's barely capable of minimum settings. WoW will run, but not well and it'll look like garbage. The Settings: External User Tweaks I would read this next part too if I were you. If you're on a Mac that has a Retina Display, the game will now choose to always run at a specific very high resolution regardless of what you set the scaling to in your System Preferences>Display settings. And as I stated in the section above, this resolution is probably way too high for your poor graphics card to handle. There are now two main ways to deal with this: - Set the in-game Resolution Scale down to something lower than 100%. - Run the game in "low resolution mode". To do this, close WoW, open a Finder window, navigate to the directory WoW is Installed to (usually "Macintosh HD/Applications/World of Warcraft"), right-click (command-click) on the WoW.app executable itself (Not the WoW Launcher), and click "Get Info". In the new "Get Info" window that pops up, tick the "Open in Low Resolution Mode" checkbox. WoW will now open at the same resolution as what the System Preferences>Display panel says your screen "looks like". From here on, you can open WoW normally from the launcher's "Play" button. The main differences between the two options are as follows: Running the game at native resolution and adjusting the resolution scaling lets you keep UI elements like your unit frames and action bars sharp while making the actual game world more or less pixelated. In contrast, running the game in low resolution mode will make everything, including the action bars, slightly more pixelated. But not as overall drastically so as lowering the resolution scaling does. Either way, it's a trade off from what we had in Legion. Personally I think running the game in low resolution mode looks and runs better on my personal Macbook Pro, but do whatever you think works best for you. Let's use my Late 2016 Macbook Pro with a Radeon Pro 460 Polaris GPU as an example: ... As you can see, I've generally kept my settings on the modest side for my Macbook Pro. I've disabled some of the more demanding settings like Sunshafts and SSAO. Another thing you might have noticed is that I'm running the game at 1920x1200, which implies that I've already set the game to run in low resolution mode as described in the section above instead of opting to run the game at native resolution and just adjust the resolution scale accordingly. Ultimately it's up to you to fiddle with the settings and decide what you're most comfortable with. The Settings: Explained Graphics > Display Display Mode: This lets you choose between running the game within a window on the desktop, or to fill up the screen while running in a borderless window. Resolution Scale: Also known as DSR, super sampling, or "SSAA", resolution scaling is basically a slider that adjusts the “internal resolution” of the game. Setting this to 200% will literally render the game at 200% of the game’s current resolution, and then downscale it to match your monitor. Gamers with extremely high end gaming rigs like to crank this up as a form of Anti-Aliasing to help smooth out edges of textures and generally make the game look better, but this has by far the single biggest impact on the performance of the game. If you’re on a 4k iMac and set this to 200%, you’re essentially running the game at 8k resolution. So unless you’ve somehow modified your Mac to have an industrial grade GPU, never set this above 100%. You can even decrease below 100% it if you want a little more performance out of the game at the cost of graphical fidelity. Extreme performance impact. Anti-Aliasing: As the in-game tool-tip says, it is a graphics filter used to smooth out jagged edges. In general, the severity of visible jagged edges changes drastically depending on the game and the graphics engine used to display it. The different types of AA listed are shown in order from the least taxing/worst quality to the most taxing/best quality, from top to bottom. Describing each type of AA goes beyond the scope of this guide, but suffice it to say, MSAA is generally the best compromise between quality and performance. FXAA is a sort of lens filter that overlays the entire screen after the game has already been rendered, and acts as a post-render effect, blurring everything including the UI elements like action bars. MSAA is added during the rendering of each frame, and only smooths out the edges of textures. As described above, SSAA is an extremely taxing method of AA that renders the AA at a much higher resolution, then downscales it to match your game’s current resolution. It’s by far the best type of AA, but it kills most graphics cards. For more info on the types of AA, go here: http://pcgamingwiki.com/wiki/Glossary:Anti-aliasing_(AA) Moderate to High performance impact. Use MSAA 2x for best balance. Vertical Sync: Vertical Sync aims to reduce the amount of "screen tearing" that occurs when the game's frame rate drops out of sync with the monitor's refresh rate. The result is a more fluid image at all times. The trade off is that it does this by limiting the game's frame rate to a multiple fraction of the screen's refresh rate. So if you have a 60Hz monitor (as most all Macs do) and the game's running at 60fps, but then drops below 60fps for whatever reason, V-Sync will instantly drop the game's frame rate down to a divisible fraction of 60fps, such as 30fps as opposed to 59fps, to avoid tearing. This can sometimes throw players off if they're not expecting the sudden drop and jitteriness in motion animation. Use whatever your eyes are most comfortable looking at. Graphics > Base Settings > Graphics Quality: This slider is an overall preset function that collectively tries to adjust every setting at once. Personally I'm more inclined to sewt it to "custom" and tune each and every setting manually. Graphics > Textures Texture Resolution: Changes the sharpness of the in-game textures like flooring, player armor, NPC skins, etc. Setting this higher doesn't require much more raw processing power from your GPU, but it does require more video memory, or VRAM. So if two video cards had 256MB of VRAM, and another had 4GB of VRAM, but the video cards were otherwise completely identical, the 4GB card would be able to load much higher resolution textures with zero performance loss because it can simply hold more in it’s memory. Think of VRAM as your video card’’s stamina. Trying to load textures on a card that doesn't have the VRAM for it will force the card to keep switching out textures in order to display them, and will generally cause the game to stutter as you move and pan the camera as it tries to load the textures it needs. Performance based directly on the amount of video memory your video card has. Texture Filtering: A filter used to enhance the sharpness of textures, as opposed to just the edges. Lowering this will increase performance, but very few modern GPUs have trouble with 16x TF anymore. Minimal performance impact. Projected Textures: This enables the projection of certain textures, like spell effects, onto the game's terrain and other object surfaces. Turning this off can drastically improve performance, especially on mobile GPUs where pipeline bandwidth (The GPU's ability to process multiple instructions to and from the CPU at once) is limited. Moderate to high performance impact. Graphics > Environment View Distance: Increases and decreases the point at which distant objects change from being flat decals to rendered, textured objects. This has a profound impact on game performance, especially in newer zones from more recent expansions, where the game's textures are much higher resolution than older zones. This uses both raw GPU power and VRAM. The higher the setting, the more the GPU has to render at once. High to extreme performance impact. Environmental Detail: This is essentially View Distance for grass. It changes the distance at which grass and other minor ground objects, like pebbles, are rendered. AMD video cards are less affected by this setting than nVidia cards are. nVidia cards have a harder time with it. Minimal to Moderate performance impact, depending on video card. Ground Clutter: Changes the density of ground clutter, like grass and pebbles. The higher the setting, the denser the grass becomes. Like Environmental Detail, nVidia cards have a harder time with it than AMD cards. Mild to Moderate performance impact. Graphics > Effects Note: Some of the following effects may be disabled completely on some lower end graphics hardware. Shadow Quality: Changes the amount of shadows rendered in the game, as well as how many layers of shadows are allowed to stack on one another. This can have a dramatic affect on performance. And in fact, Shadows has been bugged in WoW for years. High and Ultra shadows are a LOT more demanding than they should be. I personally recommend keeping Shadows to "good" on all but the highest end systems. High performance impact. Liquid Detail: Changes the water effects in the game. Low uses the old water maps from Classic WoW, while Fair and higher use the new liquid maps from Cataclysm onwards. Again, High and Ultra have a pretty large impact on game performance, especially on lower end cards. I'd keep this on "Good" unless you have a higher end Mac. Moderate to High performance impact. Sunshafts: Changes the sun's ability to shine down on objects. Again, this setting is currently bugged, and requires a lot more power to run than it really should. Keep this on "Good" or lower. Moderate to High performance impact. Particle Density: Changes the density of spells and effects. For example, on Low, a Mage's Blizzard spell might drop 20 icicles. But on Ultra, the same spell will drop 100. This setting has the most impact in raids where lots of players are casting many spells at once. If you're in a raid and suddenly need to lower your settings, this is a good one to start with. Moderate to High performance impact, depending on situation. SSAO: SSAO, or Screen-Space Ambient Occlusion is an algorithm that approximates ambient lighting. Most noticeable indoors. Higher settings add more ambient lights, and render existing ones more accurately. As with Sunshafts, SSAO is somewhat bugged, and requires more power than it should. Moderate to High performance impact. Depth Effects: Controls the depth of certain particle effects. Moderate performance impact. Lighting Quality: Changes how accurate lighting effects are rendered, and the quality of the effect. Moderate performance impact. Outline Mode: Adds colored outlines around NPCs and players alike based on faction reputation. Moderate performance impact. Epilogue Well there we have it folks. The complete updated guide for World of Warcraft: Battle For Azeroth. I hope you all had as much fun reading it as I did writing it. See you in the impending war! 3-B. Past Changes - 08/21/18: Major revisions for launch of BFA. - 09/06/17: Rewrite for major changes in patch 7.3. - 07/20/16: Major rewrite for Legion. - 10/23/14: Total revamp for WoD in light of new Retina Macs. - 10/17/13: Changed the format of the guide completely. - 03/21/12: Added Late 2011 Mac Models, updated to represent 64-bit performance. - 04/22/11: Added Late 2010 Macbook Air, notes on integrated graphics. - 12/14/10: Updated for Cataclysm, lowering some settings to accommodate slow performance. - 10/14/10: Revamped settings for new graphics interface. Removed older Mac Models. - 04/28/10: Added newest Mac models, revamped settings to uniform 60fps across all models. - 02/12/10: Revised, condensed, and corrected small typos. - 12/01/09: Added Snow Leopard and newest Mac models. Removed PowerPC Macs. - 04/21/09: Updated settings to match the new scheme in patch 3.1. - 03/13/09: Added early 2009 Mac models. - 11/20/08: Updated new information after Wrath of The Lich King launched. - 10/08/08: Complete & utter overhaul in preparation for WoTLK. - 03/30/08: Updated findings for patch 2.4. - 02/13/08: Added details concerning the OS X 10.5.2 Leopard Graphics Update. - 02/07/08: Included PowerPC G4, G5, and newest Core 2 models.Stoneblade389	6d

If you are an IT rookie they will tell you what you want to hear. Just try one time to ask a question about the SSL problem from Feb 2015, and they do an about face. In August 2015, my MacBook got hacked with the same SSH Cross Site Scripting using the Man-In-The-Middle. When I called Apple, they were dead silent. Dissembling, misdirecting, obfuscating, worst of all no help. Denied it had anything to do with "Apple" but refused to offer even the simplest of suggestions on how I can prevent it in the future. How do I know if I have the SSL fix in MBP? Well I can't because the SSL problem was in iOS. I went to the developers website and found the same iOS SSL is part of Yosemite. So again, misdirection and lies.
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