I had occasion to use customer support this week after my family gifted me with an IPad. I had difficulty with accessing after setting it up. I didn't catch the gentleman's name but I found his explanations way too fast and his tone arrogant, despite my telling him I was a senior and needed patience. I sat through a lengthy discourse on the difference between a password and a postcode, and I remained locked out. I think his telling me to hang up, sit back, relax and meditate and the password would come to me was his giving up. I give the service a zero. Once I can figure out how to reset the thing it will be going back.
* Trade-in values will vary based on the condition, year, and configuration of your trade-in device. You must be at least 18 years old to be eligible to trade in for credit or for an Apple Store Gift Card. Not all devices are eligible for credit. More details are available from Apple’s Mac trade‑in partner and Apple’s iPhone, iPad, and Apple Watch trade‑in partner for trade-in and recycling of eligible devices. Restrictions and limitations may apply. Payments are based on the received device matching the description you provided when your estimate was made. Apple reserves the right to refuse or limit the quantity of any device for any reason. In the Apple Store: Offer only available on presentation of a valid, government-issued photo ID (local law may require saving this information). Value of your current device may be applied toward purchase of a new Apple device. Offer may not be available in all stores. Some stores may have additional requirements.
Oct 31 Unable to launch game - Mojave 10.14.1 (beta) Hi all, I can't seem to launch WoW - I've uninstalled/reinstalled it and all that happens is, is the icon "bounces" in the tray for a bit, the launcher says the game is running and then nothing else happens, no splash screen, anything. I'm on Mojave 10.14.1 (beta) (not sure why, I opted out of the beta). 2018 MBP w/ Touchbar.Daefish2 Oct 31
On June 11, 2012, Apple released an updated model in the same form factor as the prior model. The new model is powered by the new Ivy Bridge dual-core Intel Core i5 and i7 processors, doubles the RAM and SSD speeds, has the new USB 3 ports (with USB 2 capability) in place of the USB 2 ports and the new MagSafe 2 charging port.[38] The camera was upgraded to 720p FaceTime HD.

Purchase a single incident of support for help troubleshooting Apple products such as AirPort devices, Apple TV, iPad, iPhone, iPod, or Mac computers; Apple operating systems such as iOS, OS X, or OS X Server (GUI only); Apple-branded consumer apps, such as FaceTime, Find My iPhone, iLife, iTunes, or iWork; or Apple-branded pro apps such as Final Cut Pro and Logic Pro.


On July 20, 2011, Apple released updates to the 11.6" and 13.3" models of the MacBook Air, which also became Apple's entry-level laptops due to lowered prices and the discontinuation of the white MacBook around the same time.[5] The mid-2011 MacBook Airs were powered by the new Sandy Bridge 1.6 or 1.7 GHz dual-core Intel Core i5, or 1.8 GHz dual-core Intel Core i7 processors, that came with an Intel HD Graphics 3000 processor, and with a backlit keyboard, two USB 2.0 ports, FaceTime camera, a standard of 2 GB of RAM (configurable up to 4 GB), Thunderbolt which shares function with Mini DisplayPort and Bluetooth was upgraded to v4.0.[36][37] Maximum SSD flash memory storage options were increased up to 256 GB. Both 11" and 13" models had an analog audio output/headphone minijack (that also supports an iPhone/iPod touch headset with microphone), but only the 13" model had an integrated SDXC-capable SD Card slot. These models use a less expensive "Eagle Ridge" Thunderbolt controller that provides two Thunderbolt channels (2 × 10 Gbit/s bidirectional), compared to the MacBook Pro which uses a "Light Ridge" controller that provides four Thunderbolt channels (4 × 10 Gbit/s bidirectional). A USB ethernet adapter was immediately available upon release and a Thunderbolt-to-Firewire 800 adapter became available in mid-year 2012.
Nov 2 macOS update message when launching WoW Is there a way to suppress the warning regarding current OS version when launching Warcraft? I'm currently on 10.13.6 and recently I started getting the message that there is an available update to my OS which will increase stability and whatever. I'm not unfamiliar to the message, I have seen it before with other updates to 10.13. I'm planning the update to Mojave at some point, but would like to stop this annoying message, it prevents auto-switching to WoW as it launches.Durr4 Nov 2
Awesome, responsive service.  Could not be happier with how timely, knowledgeable and friendly Shiva was.  He showed up when promised, kept me appraised of what he was doing, and worked very efficiently.  We had our new system up and running in no time - including a large transfer of data from an old system.  I would recommend Shiva and this company without hesitation.
6d Game unhides itself Hi everyone, For the past week or two (probably since the original 8.0 patch, but maybe one of the minor updates since then) I've had an issue where the game will sometimes unhide itself. What I mean by this is that I can press Cmd-H as usual to hide the game and show the desktop, but then a short time later the game may reactivate itself as if I'd clicked its dock icon. If I use Cmd-Tab, therefore keeping the game visible, then this issue does not occur. Has anyone else run into this? I'm on 10.12.6 with a GTX 960.Melcene12 6d
(Shared with system memory) Nvidia GeForce 320M using 256 MB of DDR3 SDRAM with Mini DisplayPort output Intel HD Graphics 3000 processor using 256 MB (11" base model) or 384 MB (all other models) of DDR3 SDRAM Intel HD Graphics 4000 processor with up to 1 GB DDR3 SDRAM shared from main memory Intel HD Graphics 5000 processor with up to 1.5 GB LPDDR3 SDRAM shared from main memory Intel HD Graphics 6000 processor with up to 1.5 GB LPDDR3 SDRAM shared from main memory
EveryMac.com is provided "as is" without warranty of any kind whatsoever. EveryMac.com, and the author thereof, shall not be held responsible or liable, under any circumstances, for any damages resulting from the use or inability to use the information within. For complete disclaimer and copyright information please read and understand the Terms of Use and the Privacy Policy before using EveryMac.com. Use of any content or images without expressed permission is not allowed, although links to any page are welcomed and appreciated.
The scammer will typically attempt to get the victim to allow remote access to their computer. After remote access is gained, the scammer relies on confidence tricks typically involving utilities built into Windows and other software in order to gain the victim’s trust to pay for the supposed “support” services, when the scammer actually steals the victim’s credit card account information.
(Shared with system memory) Nvidia GeForce 320M using 256 MB of DDR3 SDRAM with Mini DisplayPort output Intel HD Graphics 3000 processor using 256 MB (11" base model) or 384 MB (all other models) of DDR3 SDRAM Intel HD Graphics 4000 processor with up to 1 GB DDR3 SDRAM shared from main memory Intel HD Graphics 5000 processor with up to 1.5 GB LPDDR3 SDRAM shared from main memory Intel HD Graphics 6000 processor with up to 1.5 GB LPDDR3 SDRAM shared from main memory
On July 20, 2011, Apple released updates to the 11.6" and 13.3" models of the MacBook Air, which also became Apple's entry-level laptops due to lowered prices and the discontinuation of the white MacBook around the same time.[5] The mid-2011 MacBook Airs were powered by the new Sandy Bridge 1.6 or 1.7 GHz dual-core Intel Core i5, or 1.8 GHz dual-core Intel Core i7 processors, that came with an Intel HD Graphics 3000 processor, and with a backlit keyboard, two USB 2.0 ports, FaceTime camera, a standard of 2 GB of RAM (configurable up to 4 GB), Thunderbolt which shares function with Mini DisplayPort and Bluetooth was upgraded to v4.0.[36][37] Maximum SSD flash memory storage options were increased up to 256 GB. Both 11" and 13" models had an analog audio output/headphone minijack (that also supports an iPhone/iPod touch headset with microphone), but only the 13" model had an integrated SDXC-capable SD Card slot. These models use a less expensive "Eagle Ridge" Thunderbolt controller that provides two Thunderbolt channels (2 × 10 Gbit/s bidirectional), compared to the MacBook Pro which uses a "Light Ridge" controller that provides four Thunderbolt channels (4 × 10 Gbit/s bidirectional). A USB ethernet adapter was immediately available upon release and a Thunderbolt-to-Firewire 800 adapter became available in mid-year 2012.
When I tweeted — from my secret social-media account used to hide my identity as a reporter — for help about Spectre and Meltdown, Apple responded a short 10 minutes later. The company also included the correct information (update macOS on your Mac, and you're OK), along with a link to documentation on Apple's site that explained the situation in greater detail.
×