Nov 12 nVidia Boot screens on Mojave This bodes ... interesting. https://forums.macrumors.com/threads/rtx-series-cards-have-native-bootscreen-support.2148023 Seems the new nVidia RTX cards, if installed on Mojave, have boot screens stock -- no flashing required. There are no drivers available for these cards on Mac OS, but there are fairly reliable reports of Mac OS functional boot screens. Lends a lot of credence to the reports that nVidia is actually working on drivers for the Mac for the new cards. As one person with a Mac Pro 5,1 commented in the thread, this seems to be the year to write a letter to Santa Claus as apparently it might just work. First Mojave support, then NVMe support, and now this.Sagerremeseb20 Nov 12
For my second call, I asked about Siri. I opted for waiting music of my choice at 3:03 p.m. and was on the phone with John in New Mexico at 3:05. John, a friendly and to-the-point representative, pulled up the relevant article and walked me through the steps by 3:07 p.m.. He even emailed me a link to the related support page so I could have those steps handy in the future.
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The 2010 models include two speakers for stereo sound while earlier versions have one speaker located under the keyboard. The 2011 model replaces DisplayPort with a Thunderbolt 1 port, and also has a 1280×720 FaceTime HD Camera, replacing the previous 640×480 iSight camera. The 2012 model replaces USB 2 with USB 3, and uses the MagSafe 2 instead of the MagSafe connector for charging. The 2015 model updated the Thunderbolt port to Thunderbolt 2.
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On July 20, 2011, Apple released updates to the 11.6" and 13.3" models of the MacBook Air, which also became Apple's entry-level laptops due to lowered prices and the discontinuation of the white MacBook around the same time.[5] The mid-2011 MacBook Airs were powered by the new Sandy Bridge 1.6 or 1.7 GHz dual-core Intel Core i5, or 1.8 GHz dual-core Intel Core i7 processors, that came with an Intel HD Graphics 3000 processor, and with a backlit keyboard, two USB 2.0 ports, FaceTime camera, a standard of 2 GB of RAM (configurable up to 4 GB), Thunderbolt which shares function with Mini DisplayPort and Bluetooth was upgraded to v4.0.[36][37] Maximum SSD flash memory storage options were increased up to 256 GB. Both 11" and 13" models had an analog audio output/headphone minijack (that also supports an iPhone/iPod touch headset with microphone), but only the 13" model had an integrated SDXC-capable SD Card slot. These models use a less expensive "Eagle Ridge" Thunderbolt controller that provides two Thunderbolt channels (2 × 10 Gbit/s bidirectional), compared to the MacBook Pro which uses a "Light Ridge" controller that provides four Thunderbolt channels (4 × 10 Gbit/s bidirectional). A USB ethernet adapter was immediately available upon release and a Thunderbolt-to-Firewire 800 adapter became available in mid-year 2012.
NOW, though the product title DOES say that it comes preinstalled with EL CAPTAIN (or whatever), mine already came with the SIERRA update. It had Sierra Version 10.12.3 and in the app store, you can update it (FOR FREE) with the May 2017 recent Sierra 10.12.5 update! IF yours comes in with EL CAPTAIN, you can update it FOR FREE to the 2017 Sierra update - do not worry! Lol.
As a former AppeCare representative I can't stress enough how difficult this job really is. We have to deal with angry customers who waited too long on the line, give accurate information about endless features and provide an instant resolution. It is mentally exhausting and would take anyone I know into the paths of a breakdown. Now imagine when new products or software are launched. We are given a set of trainning modules to perform on a given amount of time, as per Apple recommendation. Now, what a lot of people are unaware of, is that only a few call centers are actually managed by Apple directly. Other centers are paid by Apple to train people as per their standards, but in the end of the day this is a business we are talking about, so the larger the amount of calls taken daily equals more monney for these centers. Basically, forget the trainning, we are just pushed by our local managers to do these modules as fast as possible because we are needed to take more calls. There is never time to breathe or learn anything.
Much like Apple handles support calls over the phone, soon only customers within their warranty period will be able to access online chat support through getsupport.apple.com for free. For others, Apple will charge what it refers to as a “pay per incident” fee or require the purchase of an extended warranty through AppleCare. Previously all online support chat features were available for free to users worldwide. Some users might have noticed back in August when Apple revamped its support sites that it started listing a $19.99 per incident fee for chat support. However, up until now AppleCare hasn’t actually been charging users to access the feature.
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