Steve Jobs introduced the first MacBook Air during a speech at his keynote at the 2008 Macworld conference held on January 15, 2008.[6] The first-generation MacBook Air was a 13.3"-only model, initially promoted as the world's thinnest notebook[7] (1.94cm MacBook may be compared with 1.98cm for a previous record model, 2005's Toshiba Portege R200[8]). It featured a custom[9] Intel Merom CPU and Intel GMA graphics. In late 2008, the CPU was updated to a faster, non-custom Penryn CPU and integrated Nvidia GeForce graphics while the hard drive capacity was increased and the micro-DVI video port was replaced by the Mini DisplayPort.[10] A mid-2009 refresh, introduced alongside the MacBook Pro family, featured a slightly higher-capacity battery, and a faster Penryn CPU.[11]
The 11" MacBook Air carried the desirable essential attributes of a netbook, but without the drawbacks of a slower processor and less capable operating system,[52] albeit at a higher price.[53][54][55][56][57] At the low end, Apple introduced the iPad—a different form factor than the netbook, but with improved computing capabilities and lower production cost. Both of these led to a decline in netbook sales, and most PC manufacturers have consequently discontinued their netbook lines in response.[58] Capitalizing on the success of the MacBook Air,[59] Intel promoted Ultrabook as a new high-mobility standard, which has been hailed by some analysts as succeeding where netbooks failed.[60][61][62]
“Prior to the laser we fabricated all our components on the turret press or on manual machines. The operations required hours of cleanup. Punch-formed parts and louvers are reserved for our existing turret punches but the laser has taken on 90 percent of the workload with minimal cleanup. We’ve been able to reclaim that time and move our manpower from the hand labor it took to make and clean parts to assembly work instead. As a result we’ve increased output, stepped up assembly time and cut fabrication time by weeks for some components.”
Apple is the king of consumer laptop tech support, and the company added to its repertoire in the past year. In addition to answering questions via social media, live online chats, its support app and phone calls, the company began posting tutorials to a YouTube channel in November 2017. These options flank the company's existing Genius Bar, which still stands out as one of the few ways users can get in-person support directly from a laptop-maker.
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