Starting over again, multiple times, I kept getting the same result, until (without any real indicator of why) everything worked properly. The words "phone number" finally appeared above that field, and the form also automatically formatted my number in the (123) 456-7890 style and allowed me to receive the calls. This error came up during my first two calls, but not my third.
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Steve Jobs introduced the first MacBook Air during a speech at his keynote at the 2008 Macworld conference held on January 15, 2008.[6] The first-generation MacBook Air was a 13.3"-only model, initially promoted as the world's thinnest notebook[7] (1.94cm MacBook may be compared with 1.98cm for a previous record model, 2005's Toshiba Portege R200[8]). It featured a custom[9] Intel Merom CPU and Intel GMA graphics. In late 2008, the CPU was updated to a faster, non-custom Penryn CPU and integrated Nvidia GeForce graphics while the hard drive capacity was increased and the micro-DVI video port was replaced by the Mini DisplayPort.[10] A mid-2009 refresh, introduced alongside the MacBook Pro family, featured a slightly higher-capacity battery, and a faster Penryn CPU.[11]
The 11" MacBook Air carried the desirable essential attributes of a netbook, but without the drawbacks of a slower processor and less capable operating system,[52] albeit at a higher price.[53][54][55][56][57] At the low end, Apple introduced the iPad—a different form factor than the netbook, but with improved computing capabilities and lower production cost. Both of these led to a decline in netbook sales, and most PC manufacturers have consequently discontinued their netbook lines in response.[58] Capitalizing on the success of the MacBook Air,[59] Intel promoted Ultrabook as a new high-mobility standard, which has been hailed by some analysts as succeeding where netbooks failed.[60][61][62]

In addition to onsite hardware coverage, you can repair up to 2 percent of your covered Mac computers, or up to 5 percent of your covered iPad or iPhone devices, for any reason. So if an employee accidentally damages a device, AppleCare for Enterprise can cover that, too. In most cases, Apple can repair or replace the device within one business day.

In the Box Apple MQD32LL/A MacBook Air, 6x6" Projector Supercenter Microfiber cloth, Power Adapter, AC Wall plug; and Power Cord. Apple MQD32LL/A MacBook Air, 6x6" Projector Supercenter Microfiber cloth, Power Adapter, AC Wall plug, Power Cord, and Inateck 13" Black Laptop Sleeve. Apple MQD32LL/A MacBook Air, 6x6" Projector Supercenter Microfiber cloth, Power Adapter, AC Wall plug, Power Cord, and Inateck Gray 13" Laptop sleeve. Apple MQD32LL/A MacBook Air, 6x6" Projector Supercenter Microfiber cloth, Power Adapter, AC Wall plug, Power Cord, and MB829LL/A Magic Mouse 1. Apple MQD32LL/A MacBook Air, 6x6" Projector Supercenter Microfiber cloth, Power Adapter, AC Wall plug, Power Cord, and Apple MLA02LL/A Magic Mouse 2. Apple MQD42LL/A MacBook Air, 6x6" Projector Supercenter Microfiber cloth, Power Adapter, AC Wall plug; and Power Cord.


Apple is about to begin charging users outside of their warranty for online chat support using a new web payment system it recently developed. Sources familiar with the project say Apple is currently expecting to launch the new paid chat support, which will also let customers schedule repairs and replacements online, as early as next week. Here’s how it works:
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