In the Box Apple MQD32LL/A MacBook Air, 6x6" Projector Supercenter Microfiber cloth, Power Adapter, AC Wall plug; and Power Cord. Apple MQD32LL/A MacBook Air, 6x6" Projector Supercenter Microfiber cloth, Power Adapter, AC Wall plug, Power Cord, and Inateck 13" Black Laptop Sleeve. Apple MQD32LL/A MacBook Air, 6x6" Projector Supercenter Microfiber cloth, Power Adapter, AC Wall plug, Power Cord, and Inateck Gray 13" Laptop sleeve. Apple MQD32LL/A MacBook Air, 6x6" Projector Supercenter Microfiber cloth, Power Adapter, AC Wall plug, Power Cord, and MB829LL/A Magic Mouse 1. Apple MQD32LL/A MacBook Air, 6x6" Projector Supercenter Microfiber cloth, Power Adapter, AC Wall plug, Power Cord, and Apple MLA02LL/A Magic Mouse 2. Apple MQD42LL/A MacBook Air, 6x6" Projector Supercenter Microfiber cloth, Power Adapter, AC Wall plug; and Power Cord.
When released in October 2010, the 13" model's screen resolution was higher than the average 1366x768 screens of similar sized laptops. However, by mid-2013, with many premium Ultrabooks having high resolution screens (1080p or greater) as standard or upgrades, the MacBook Air has been increasingly criticized for sticking with a low-resolution screen. Many in the tech community had expected Apple to release a MacBook Air with Retina Display by mid-2013, similar to the MacBook Pro Retina which came out in 2012.[78] The October 2013 refresh of the 13" MacBook Pro Retina, with a slimmer chassis and a lower price point, was mentioned as a potential MacBook Air alternative as the battery life is not much shorter while not being considerably bulkier.[4][79] Apple released an entry-level version of the 13" MacBook Pro on October 27, 2016, which was specifically targeted towards MacBook Air users.[80]
Through July 1, 2013, the MacBook Air took in 56 percent of all Ultrabook sales in the United States, despite being one of the higher-priced competitors. [66] Apple had previously dominated the premium PC market, in 2009 having a 91 percent market share for PCs priced at more than $1,000, according to NPD, and Ultrabooks were an attempt by other PC manufacturers to move in on Apple's turf.[67] While Apple's MacBook lines were not immune to this consumer trend towards mobile devices,[68] they still managed to ship 2.8 million MacBooks in Q2 2012 (the majority of which were the MacBook Air) compared to 500,000 total Ultrabooks,[69][70] despite there being dozens of Ultrabooks from various manufacturers on the market while Apple only offered 11" and 13" models of the Macbook Air.[71] Forrester Research analyst Frank Gillett attributes Apple's increased success in the enterprise market to the 2010 MacBook Air and the iPad.[72]
Nov 1 External GPU case for new versions of MBP Good evening US folks from Russia, with love! I run wow on the latest version of MBP available, yet I have to admit that I'm not any happy with a framerate while doing even 20man raids (30-man raids are a total disaster). I don't really want to buy a PC and prefer to stay with Apple stack, since WoW is the only game I play nowadays, so I want to do something about it. According to iStat Menus logs, my CPU usage of my i7-3820hq is never getting above 60% when I'm raiding, so the bottleneck should be my GPU (Radeon Pro 560). I do agree that running game on retina display is a bit too much for this adapter which could be barely considered as a gaming card, but also I'm happy with how smooth the picture is and don't really want to lower my resolution. So I decided to go with GPU case idea, and now I'm really lost, since it looks like there's no standard and many companies sell a lot of devices, some are compatible with Apple devices, and some aren't. So I have a two questions: 1) Will GTX1060-level GPU will be enough for smooth ~60+ FPS in raids (medium settins, projected textures on, shadows off) on 15-inch MBP display (2880 x 1800 resolution)? Or should I get 1070 instead? 2) What about built-in display support? I don't really want to keep another monitor around the house, so I'm not ready to consider options with no built-in display support, unless there's none of them. 3) Am I right that nVidia driver support on macOS is a bit 'hackey' and unofficial right now, and it's better for me to buy Radeon instead? 4) Most important, is there anyone on this forum who uses new (2016+) version of MBP with external GPU case and could just tell me which device to buy? This is the most interesting thing for me, since on web, I found a few videos of eGPU being used with 2013 version of MBP, but I never saw 2016 one. So anyway, looking for any option which is below $700-800 total (assuming I should buy both eGPU case + graphic card), hoping that there is any viable solution for me instead of buying PC which I don't really need for anything but raiding.Belthaar12 Nov 1
Following its introduction, the MacBook Air was greeted with a mixed reception. The portability of the MacBook Air was praised in reviews, but the compromise in features was criticized.[17][18][19] The full-sized keyboard, weight, thinness, and Multi-Touch trackpad were appreciated in reviews, while the limited configuration options and ports, slow speed (in non-SSD models), non-user-replaceable battery, small hard drive, and price were criticized.[17][18] The flip-down hatch on the side of the original MacBook Air is a tight fit for some headphone plugs and USB devices, requiring users to purchase an extension cable. Apple removed the flip-down hatch on the late 2010 model in favor of open connection ports, as is the case with most other laptops.[20][21]
A few days ago I spoke to an Apple customer service rep about getting an adapter. I first went on line to see which one I needed, wasn't sure so I asked for professional help. After twenty minutes, after being on hold for about fifteen minutes, I spoke to someone who didn't seem to have a clue. She put me on hold and then got back on the line to tell me which adapter would work. I needed an adapter for my older printer, so one end had to fit into the back of my new Mac and the other fit the printer plug. The adapter arrived today and it was too small at the computer end. I called Apple back. To make a long story short, I spoke to five people - all of them useless. I was wondering if I was speaking Klingon because nobody seemed to understand that I needed the adapter to plug into the back of my computer and that the other end did fit my printer. They kept assuming that the printer end was the problem. I was passed on to a supervisor who was just as clueless. I was then passed on to someone who was to source the right sized adapter for me and she was the worst of the lot. I can't understand how a company that makes my computer has no idea which adapter I would need for it and after five people, finally one of them realizes that Apple doesn't make them. I got all my other adapters at The Source and they fit perfectly, unfortunately they no longer carry this product. The worst customer service ever and not once did anyone say to me to return this item because I was recommended the wrong size. Not once did anyone offer a refund. I sent the stupid thing back this evening with a note for them to 'stick it where the sun don't shine.' Go anywhere else if you need help with products for your Mac - Apple customer service reps don't have a clue.
Pros Tech Support aims to fill in the gaps in support that Apple doesn’t cover. Out of warranty support? We’ll take care of you. Need help with a 3rd party product? Give us a try. Want someone to remotely connect to your computer and fix the problem for you, instead of having to spend forever on the phone doing it yourself? You’ve found the right place.
Nov 1 Wow Freezing Hello everyone, I was just in a battleground and as soon as I got into a fight WoW freezed and I had to force quit it. When I joined back in, the game freezed again as soon as I got into a fight. This happened for other 2 times more. I am playing from the new Macbook pro 2018, High Sierra and I've never experienced anything like this up until today. Do any of you know what's going on?Eathiel0 Nov 1
Apple is the king of consumer laptop tech support, and the company added to its repertoire in the past year. In addition to answering questions via social media, live online chats, its support app and phone calls, the company began posting tutorials to a YouTube channel in November 2017. These options flank the company's existing Genius Bar, which still stands out as one of the few ways users can get in-person support directly from a laptop-maker.
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