Through July 1, 2013, the MacBook Air took in 56 percent of all Ultrabook sales in the United States, despite being one of the higher-priced competitors. [66] Apple had previously dominated the premium PC market, in 2009 having a 91 percent market share for PCs priced at more than $1,000, according to NPD, and Ultrabooks were an attempt by other PC manufacturers to move in on Apple's turf.[67] While Apple's MacBook lines were not immune to this consumer trend towards mobile devices,[68] they still managed to ship 2.8 million MacBooks in Q2 2012 (the majority of which were the MacBook Air) compared to 500,000 total Ultrabooks,[69][70] despite there being dozens of Ultrabooks from various manufacturers on the market while Apple only offered 11" and 13" models of the Macbook Air.[71] Forrester Research analyst Frank Gillett attributes Apple's increased success in the enterprise market to the 2010 MacBook Air and the iPad.[72]
On October 20, 2010, Apple released a redesigned 13.3" model with a tapered enclosure, higher screen resolution, improved battery, and flash storage instead of a hard drive. In addition, a new 11.6" model was introduced, offering reduced cost, weight, battery life, and performance relative to the 13.3" model, but better performance than typical netbooks of the time.[32][33][34][35]

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Apple’s One-Year Limited Warranty for MacBook Air excludes coverage for damage resulting from a number of events, including accident, liquid spill or submersion, unauthorized service and unauthorized modifications. If damage is outside the scope of warranty coverage, service may be available through a local AASP or an Apple retail store, but all service charges will be your responsibility. In such an event, you will be asked to approve the estimated charges and accept the terms and conditions for service before authorizing the repair. If the repair is performed at an Apple retail store Apple's Repair Terms and Conditions will govern service. Repair service for a MacBook Air that has experienced catastrophic damage, for example extensive liquid damage or a severe impact that results in the product being disassembled into multiple pieces, is generally not available and not eligible for service.

Apple is the king of consumer laptop tech support, and the company added to its repertoire in the past year. In addition to answering questions via social media, live online chats, its support app and phone calls, the company began posting tutorials to a YouTube channel in November 2017. These options flank the company's existing Genius Bar, which still stands out as one of the few ways users can get in-person support directly from a laptop-maker.
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